“… the body loses self-awareness precisely at those moments when it could be most revealing; consequently, memory cannot retain what the body had not been aware of, allowing crucial gestures to slip away, though it also endows them with a very special air, as the memory of a fainting spell can preserve only the curious sensations of losing and then regaining consciousness while the fainting itself, most intriguing to us, for it’s a state like no other, remains inaccessible, unknowable.” – peter nadas

19/07/2012 § 3 Comments

photography by michael wesely
top to bottom:
Ostjakobswarft, Fahretoft 17.27 – 17.32 Uhr, 25.7.2009
Allianz Arena 19.2.2003-28.5.2005
Palast der Republik, Berlin 28.6.2006 – 19.12.2008

 

understandable but unknowable.  somehow, michael wesely has managed to capture a two year exposure.

 

a state like no other

a young hare

 

 

notes:

[title]     Nádas, Péter, Ivan Sanders, and Imre Goldstein. A Book of Memories: A Novel. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1997. P: 74.  Print

[images]     todays images are the confounding efforts of michael wesely.

[more bombastic photography]     the last time peter nadas’ name appeared on ayh i was also mentioning something about photography.  a lot has happened since then.  idris kahn’s work also seems relevant.

§ 3 Responses to “… the body loses self-awareness precisely at those moments when it could be most revealing; consequently, memory cannot retain what the body had not been aware of, allowing crucial gestures to slip away, though it also endows them with a very special air, as the memory of a fainting spell can preserve only the curious sensations of losing and then regaining consciousness while the fainting itself, most intriguing to us, for it’s a state like no other, remains inaccessible, unknowable.” – peter nadas

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You are currently reading “… the body loses self-awareness precisely at those moments when it could be most revealing; consequently, memory cannot retain what the body had not been aware of, allowing crucial gestures to slip away, though it also endows them with a very special air, as the memory of a fainting spell can preserve only the curious sensations of losing and then regaining consciousness while the fainting itself, most intriguing to us, for it’s a state like no other, remains inaccessible, unknowable.” – peter nadas at a young hare.

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